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Date

4-30-2020

Description

Through Analyzing Hieronymus Bosch The Garden of Earthly Delights using Freud's "Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality" specifically focusing on the Sexual Aberrations, will give a deeper insight into the immense sexuality used throughout the triptych. Out of Freud's "Three Essays," the focus will be on Essay one, Sexual Aberrations. Sexual Aberrations are sexual fantasies or Kinks that society has deemed as wrong or indifferent. The Garden of Earthly Delights has been analyzed by many different art historians using religious or historical perspectives, however, some have taken a more psychological approach to deciphering the obscure work of H. Bosch. A few art historians like Laurinda S. Dixon, and Noah Charney have mentioned Freud's psychodynamic, and unheimlich approach and the implications it had on the painting but none have taken a deeper look at how his psychosexual theories overlap on the religious scenes. Using Freud's ideas on Sexual Aberrations, specifically Inversions, Animals as sexual objects, and sexual utilization of the anal opening, will further explain the exaggerated use of sexuality in Bosch's triptych. Each panel has scenes of either full-blown sexual acts or scenes that indirectly imply sex. Freud's Theories on sexuality will give a different perspective to the very erotic scenes of the Garden of Eden, Paradise, and Hell, unraveling one of the big questions, is this a Paradise without God.

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

A Paradise Without God: Psychosexual Analysis of Hieronymus Bosch The Garden of Earthly Delights

Through Analyzing Hieronymus Bosch The Garden of Earthly Delights using Freud's "Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality" specifically focusing on the Sexual Aberrations, will give a deeper insight into the immense sexuality used throughout the triptych. Out of Freud's "Three Essays," the focus will be on Essay one, Sexual Aberrations. Sexual Aberrations are sexual fantasies or Kinks that society has deemed as wrong or indifferent. The Garden of Earthly Delights has been analyzed by many different art historians using religious or historical perspectives, however, some have taken a more psychological approach to deciphering the obscure work of H. Bosch. A few art historians like Laurinda S. Dixon, and Noah Charney have mentioned Freud's psychodynamic, and unheimlich approach and the implications it had on the painting but none have taken a deeper look at how his psychosexual theories overlap on the religious scenes. Using Freud's ideas on Sexual Aberrations, specifically Inversions, Animals as sexual objects, and sexual utilization of the anal opening, will further explain the exaggerated use of sexuality in Bosch's triptych. Each panel has scenes of either full-blown sexual acts or scenes that indirectly imply sex. Freud's Theories on sexuality will give a different perspective to the very erotic scenes of the Garden of Eden, Paradise, and Hell, unraveling one of the big questions, is this a Paradise without God.