Date

4-29-2020

Description

In my essay, "Faking Our Deaths: A Look at the Glamorization of Death in the Media," I propose that the Young Adult publishing and film industry have glamorized death, creating an unrealistic representation of it, that is inappropriate and unsuitable for YA audiences. I use The Fault in Our Stars, as my focus to argue that Green's idealized and romanticized depiction of Hazel's and Gus's cancer conveys an unjust misconception of death. I demonstrate how Green created a standard of death that is comfortable, thus unfair and unhealthy for his audiences to consume. I draw upon Kathryn James's Death, Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Adolescent Literature, and her claim that society has created of a construct of a "good" vs. "bad" death. I use James to read the death story Green tells as an unattainable expectation, one that needs to be stopped. I attest that Green's concept of death is problematic because it does not prepare audiences to be able to cope with the reality, that their own death, or the passing of others may not be glorious or noteworthy.

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM

Faking Our Deaths: A Look at the Glamorization of Death in the Media

In my essay, "Faking Our Deaths: A Look at the Glamorization of Death in the Media," I propose that the Young Adult publishing and film industry have glamorized death, creating an unrealistic representation of it, that is inappropriate and unsuitable for YA audiences. I use The Fault in Our Stars, as my focus to argue that Green's idealized and romanticized depiction of Hazel's and Gus's cancer conveys an unjust misconception of death. I demonstrate how Green created a standard of death that is comfortable, thus unfair and unhealthy for his audiences to consume. I draw upon Kathryn James's Death, Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Adolescent Literature, and her claim that society has created of a construct of a "good" vs. "bad" death. I use James to read the death story Green tells as an unattainable expectation, one that needs to be stopped. I attest that Green's concept of death is problematic because it does not prepare audiences to be able to cope with the reality, that their own death, or the passing of others may not be glorious or noteworthy.