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Date

4-28-2020

Description

"Ishmael na my name" is a sequence of 136 haiku in the Pidgin English of Onyinye Miriam Uwolloh's native Nigeria. It was her final project in Dr. Robert K. Wallace's course on Moby-Dick and the Arts, and narrates the entire story through the multinational language many whalers used to communicate on their ships. In addition, Uwolloh is the first known African to react to the novel; she presented her creative work at the 12th International Melville Society Conference: Melville's Origins in June 2019 which celebrated the bicentennial of Herman Melville's birth. There a shortened version of the haiku sequence was launched at The Strand Bookstore in New York through its published format in After Moby-Dick: An Anthology of Poetry. This poetry sequence creatively and interpretively responds to the binding ties of Pidgin showcased in the Great American Novel. By reflecting on the influence of language, Pidgin language in particular, Uwolloh's haiku serve to provide new insights into the story Melville wrote in the 1850s for our global, post-Colonial world.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Ishmael na my name: Nigerian Pidgin English Haiku for each chapter of Moby-Dick

"Ishmael na my name" is a sequence of 136 haiku in the Pidgin English of Onyinye Miriam Uwolloh's native Nigeria. It was her final project in Dr. Robert K. Wallace's course on Moby-Dick and the Arts, and narrates the entire story through the multinational language many whalers used to communicate on their ships. In addition, Uwolloh is the first known African to react to the novel; she presented her creative work at the 12th International Melville Society Conference: Melville's Origins in June 2019 which celebrated the bicentennial of Herman Melville's birth. There a shortened version of the haiku sequence was launched at The Strand Bookstore in New York through its published format in After Moby-Dick: An Anthology of Poetry. This poetry sequence creatively and interpretively responds to the binding ties of Pidgin showcased in the Great American Novel. By reflecting on the influence of language, Pidgin language in particular, Uwolloh's haiku serve to provide new insights into the story Melville wrote in the 1850s for our global, post-Colonial world.