Date

6-2-2020

Description

This paper will examine the impact of domestic and foreign tensions that pressured the United States to pass the Hart-Celler Act of 1965, and consequently, unintentionally transformed Asian immigration to the United States. By examining this historically important document, I outline both domestic and foreign factors, the rise of the civil rights movement in the 1960s, and United States's need to rebrand itself as the leader of the free world during the Cold War, as critical factors that led to these radical reforms in the immigration policies of 1965. I argue that the United States intended the Hart-Celler Act as a short-term solution to these domestic and foreign problems at hand and to be a merely symbolic act that subtly sustained the preexisting racial homogeneity of the United States. In this paper, I will investigate how the Hart-Celler Act of 1965, instead, completely revolutionized immigration trends, specifically that of Asian Americans, and hugely diversified the United States to what it is today.

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Jun 2nd, 12:00 AM

Hart-Celler Act and the Civil Rights Movement

This paper will examine the impact of domestic and foreign tensions that pressured the United States to pass the Hart-Celler Act of 1965, and consequently, unintentionally transformed Asian immigration to the United States. By examining this historically important document, I outline both domestic and foreign factors, the rise of the civil rights movement in the 1960s, and United States's need to rebrand itself as the leader of the free world during the Cold War, as critical factors that led to these radical reforms in the immigration policies of 1965. I argue that the United States intended the Hart-Celler Act as a short-term solution to these domestic and foreign problems at hand and to be a merely symbolic act that subtly sustained the preexisting racial homogeneity of the United States. In this paper, I will investigate how the Hart-Celler Act of 1965, instead, completely revolutionized immigration trends, specifically that of Asian Americans, and hugely diversified the United States to what it is today.