Date

6-2-2020

Description

Google Arts and Culture (GAC, former name: Google Art Project) is a non-profit program within the Google Cultural Institute that provides open-access online exhibitions for users and shares technical tools with cultural institutions across the globe. This paper shows that digital museum platforms serve the study of art by introducing new possibilities for accessibility, functionality and diversity, but questions whether or not GAC adopts a diverse representation of global art. Two specific phenomena are highlighted to inform the discussion: the standardization of all arts and culture and the compatibility of two-dimensional art with the digitization processes. This paper argues that the framework of GAC follows the tradition of enlightenment education, while the internet based platform promotes access to information for the masses. The hyper-communicative characteristic of the Internet allows multiple types of art to exist inside it, forming new models that break distinctions between art and artifacts in terms of presentation and valuation. However, the tradition of digitalization can not escape from its Western perspective. The tool of digital documentation has its own cultural implications, which favors Western two-dimensional art. Even though GAC’s digital technology provides open access to more information about arts and culture, it fails to resolve the perpetuation of Western values. Furthermore, three-dimensional digital technologies can be better implemented for presenting three-dimensional cultural objects, especially non-Western art.

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Jun 2nd, 12:00 AM

The Narration of Art on Google Arts and Culture

Google Arts and Culture (GAC, former name: Google Art Project) is a non-profit program within the Google Cultural Institute that provides open-access online exhibitions for users and shares technical tools with cultural institutions across the globe. This paper shows that digital museum platforms serve the study of art by introducing new possibilities for accessibility, functionality and diversity, but questions whether or not GAC adopts a diverse representation of global art. Two specific phenomena are highlighted to inform the discussion: the standardization of all arts and culture and the compatibility of two-dimensional art with the digitization processes. This paper argues that the framework of GAC follows the tradition of enlightenment education, while the internet based platform promotes access to information for the masses. The hyper-communicative characteristic of the Internet allows multiple types of art to exist inside it, forming new models that break distinctions between art and artifacts in terms of presentation and valuation. However, the tradition of digitalization can not escape from its Western perspective. The tool of digital documentation has its own cultural implications, which favors Western two-dimensional art. Even though GAC’s digital technology provides open access to more information about arts and culture, it fails to resolve the perpetuation of Western values. Furthermore, three-dimensional digital technologies can be better implemented for presenting three-dimensional cultural objects, especially non-Western art.