Presenter Information

Kyleah Kirby, Wheaton CollegeFollow

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Date

6-2-2020

Description

In the Majority-World, the formal seed system, comprised of government entities, private and commercial seed companies, supplies less than 20% of seed for most food (Almekinders et al. 1994; Sperling and McGuire 2010). Local or informal seed systems are critical seed suppliers to small-holder farmers who produce the bulk of agricultural products (Seboka and Deressa 2000; Thiele 1999). While there has been significant research on underutilized seed varieties and storage methods for seed banks in South East Asia, there has been comparatively little research on the human side of seed systems – specifically on the motivations and desires of seed bank managers which lead to the formation and continuation of seed banks. Beyond just physical resources, knowing the emotional and relational resources necessary for seed bank formation will benefit agricultural organizations who seek to support food security in South East Asia. Through in-depth interviews and SWOT Analysis with over 15 seed-bank managers from 5 different South East Asia Countries who attended the first Regional Seed Bank Managers Forum at ECHO Asia Foundation Thailand, my research attempts to uncover the emotional and relational networks which carry this population through adversity and inspires their work. My project identifies factors such as government opposition, support of local community, family history of agriculture, access to training, and personal values, which influence the quality of seed bank manager’s motivations. These results provide context for stakeholders interested in food security and sovereignty among small-holder farmers in South East Asia.

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Jun 2nd, 12:00 AM

A Seed of Inspiration: Motivating Factors for Seed Bank Managers in South East Asia

In the Majority-World, the formal seed system, comprised of government entities, private and commercial seed companies, supplies less than 20% of seed for most food (Almekinders et al. 1994; Sperling and McGuire 2010). Local or informal seed systems are critical seed suppliers to small-holder farmers who produce the bulk of agricultural products (Seboka and Deressa 2000; Thiele 1999). While there has been significant research on underutilized seed varieties and storage methods for seed banks in South East Asia, there has been comparatively little research on the human side of seed systems – specifically on the motivations and desires of seed bank managers which lead to the formation and continuation of seed banks. Beyond just physical resources, knowing the emotional and relational resources necessary for seed bank formation will benefit agricultural organizations who seek to support food security in South East Asia. Through in-depth interviews and SWOT Analysis with over 15 seed-bank managers from 5 different South East Asia Countries who attended the first Regional Seed Bank Managers Forum at ECHO Asia Foundation Thailand, my research attempts to uncover the emotional and relational networks which carry this population through adversity and inspires their work. My project identifies factors such as government opposition, support of local community, family history of agriculture, access to training, and personal values, which influence the quality of seed bank manager’s motivations. These results provide context for stakeholders interested in food security and sovereignty among small-holder farmers in South East Asia.