Date

5-14-2020

Description

Frantz Fanon is one of the earliest thinkers in the decolonial school of thought. His book "The Wretched of the Earth" has a powerful message about the practical necessity of a decolonial revolution. However, I propose that because Fanon is reluctant to let go of "Manichean logic", his idea of a decolonial future is impossible because one hegemonic world, the colonial one, will simply be replaced with another, the decolonial one. We can use feminist scholars Chandra Mohanty and Maria Lugones to augment Fanon's somewhat flawed argument for decolonialism. While neither of these authors directly address Fanon's idea of Manichean Logic, they both argue that colonial society is dichotomous and hierarchical, which is functionally the same thing. Lugones posits that a decolonial revolution is composed of individuals who do not fit within clean dichotomous categories whereas Mohanty describes how all problems resulting from colonialism require their own unique solution motivated only by the people affected by said problem. While both scholars suggest that Manichean logic must be rejected in order to fully decolonize, neither of them deny that the colonizers themselves are homogeneous. Both Lugones and Mohanty argue for the intersectionality of decolonial society, but hold on to Fanon's idea that colonial society is monolithic. They state that you can have a diverse "us", or decolonial society, but you can not have a revolution without an enemy, and therefore colonial society continues to be depicted as one entity.

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May 14th, 12:00 AM

Fighting Fire with Fire: The Evolution and Problems with Frantz Fanon's Manichean Logic

Frantz Fanon is one of the earliest thinkers in the decolonial school of thought. His book "The Wretched of the Earth" has a powerful message about the practical necessity of a decolonial revolution. However, I propose that because Fanon is reluctant to let go of "Manichean logic", his idea of a decolonial future is impossible because one hegemonic world, the colonial one, will simply be replaced with another, the decolonial one. We can use feminist scholars Chandra Mohanty and Maria Lugones to augment Fanon's somewhat flawed argument for decolonialism. While neither of these authors directly address Fanon's idea of Manichean Logic, they both argue that colonial society is dichotomous and hierarchical, which is functionally the same thing. Lugones posits that a decolonial revolution is composed of individuals who do not fit within clean dichotomous categories whereas Mohanty describes how all problems resulting from colonialism require their own unique solution motivated only by the people affected by said problem. While both scholars suggest that Manichean logic must be rejected in order to fully decolonize, neither of them deny that the colonizers themselves are homogeneous. Both Lugones and Mohanty argue for the intersectionality of decolonial society, but hold on to Fanon's idea that colonial society is monolithic. They state that you can have a diverse "us", or decolonial society, but you can not have a revolution without an enemy, and therefore colonial society continues to be depicted as one entity.