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Date

5-13-2020

Description

In 2017, the Cuban street artist Yulier P. Rodriguez was thrown in jail and forced to sign a document saying he would never paint on the street walls again. Soon after, the government began covering up his anti-Castro murals at night. Yulier once had over 200 paintings on the walls of Havana, and now, less than 30 exist. My ethnographic research conducted in Havana in May 2018 and 2019 details political art and government censorship in Post-Fidel Cuba. It looks at how street artists use agency to protest the communist regime. Specifically, my project encapsulates Yulier's life and looks at how he uses art as a form of resistance. Through ethnographic research methods (participant observation, oral interviews and photography) I examine how these artists persevere despite being under constant government surveillance. My research focuses on dissenting artists in Havana and examines how this trend fits into the broader experience of communist regimes, past and present. My project presents a new facet of these regimes in hopes of gaining a broader understanding of the comparative experience and impact communism can have on people worldwide.

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May 13th, 12:00 AM

Politics, Art and Dissent in Post-Fidel Cuba

In 2017, the Cuban street artist Yulier P. Rodriguez was thrown in jail and forced to sign a document saying he would never paint on the street walls again. Soon after, the government began covering up his anti-Castro murals at night. Yulier once had over 200 paintings on the walls of Havana, and now, less than 30 exist. My ethnographic research conducted in Havana in May 2018 and 2019 details political art and government censorship in Post-Fidel Cuba. It looks at how street artists use agency to protest the communist regime. Specifically, my project encapsulates Yulier's life and looks at how he uses art as a form of resistance. Through ethnographic research methods (participant observation, oral interviews and photography) I examine how these artists persevere despite being under constant government surveillance. My research focuses on dissenting artists in Havana and examines how this trend fits into the broader experience of communist regimes, past and present. My project presents a new facet of these regimes in hopes of gaining a broader understanding of the comparative experience and impact communism can have on people worldwide.