Date

5-13-2020

Description

This paper is focused on the interactions between native Celtic culture and Christianity in Early Medieval Scotland and Ireland. The primary argument is that the roots of early Christian hagiography in Ireland are based on Celtic folklore. Specifically, it will explores the ways in which early Irish saints like Patrick, Colmcille, and Brigid are portrayed as mythological heroes in Irish folklore. The Life of Brigid and the Tain Bo Cuilainge are used as primary sources. The Tain is an example of the model that Irish mythological heroes were based off, whereas the Life of Brigid is a specific example of a Celtic goddess turned Christian saint. It also looks at the ways that cultures interact with each other, specifically how separate intellectual streams can syncretize into one new tradition. These ideas are important to explore, as they can be observed throughout the rest of the Western Europe. This is specifically important to acknowledge in the case of Ireland, which would be the home base of missionary work to the rest of early Medieval Europe.

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May 13th, 12:00 AM

Celtic Culture and Early Christianity as Simultaneous Intellectual Movements in the Early Medieval Scotland and Ireland

This paper is focused on the interactions between native Celtic culture and Christianity in Early Medieval Scotland and Ireland. The primary argument is that the roots of early Christian hagiography in Ireland are based on Celtic folklore. Specifically, it will explores the ways in which early Irish saints like Patrick, Colmcille, and Brigid are portrayed as mythological heroes in Irish folklore. The Life of Brigid and the Tain Bo Cuilainge are used as primary sources. The Tain is an example of the model that Irish mythological heroes were based off, whereas the Life of Brigid is a specific example of a Celtic goddess turned Christian saint. It also looks at the ways that cultures interact with each other, specifically how separate intellectual streams can syncretize into one new tradition. These ideas are important to explore, as they can be observed throughout the rest of the Western Europe. This is specifically important to acknowledge in the case of Ireland, which would be the home base of missionary work to the rest of early Medieval Europe.