Date

5-13-2020

Description

This study hopes to document how structures within the public education system affects the educational attainment of first-generation Vietnamese American students. Educational attainment significantly depends on student's social networks and resources, as these dynamics can affect whether they feel like they can attain a higher degree after high school. In other words, social capital and socioeconomic status can have a significant impact an individual's aspirations. In this study, I examine and investigate the educational attainment of Vietnamese American students and the obstacles they face in applying to and attending college. This attainment process includes the different variables that go into a student's decision to pursue a higher degree after high school. Social capital plays a fundamental role in academic achievement and students of lower socioeconomic status must find different means to achieving "traditional" pathways of success (Palmer, R. T., & Maramba, D. C., 2015; Museus & Mueller, 2018). Lack of social capital compounded with a racialized identity sets first-generation Vietnamese American students in a unique and unacknowledged realm within educational spaces. While they are presumed to do well because of their racialized identities, educational attainment, or the lack thereof, reflects a problem that goes unseen. My project will investigate educational attainment and the relationships between effort, achievement, racialized identities, and tracking. My research questions are: What obstacles do Vietnamese American students experience during their time in high school and how do these experiences affect their post-secondary educational career? What effect does social capital have on academic achievement, persistence, and aspirations?

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May 13th, 12:00 AM

Compounded Effects of the Model Minority Stereotype and Lack of Social Capital Among Vietnamese American Students

This study hopes to document how structures within the public education system affects the educational attainment of first-generation Vietnamese American students. Educational attainment significantly depends on student's social networks and resources, as these dynamics can affect whether they feel like they can attain a higher degree after high school. In other words, social capital and socioeconomic status can have a significant impact an individual's aspirations. In this study, I examine and investigate the educational attainment of Vietnamese American students and the obstacles they face in applying to and attending college. This attainment process includes the different variables that go into a student's decision to pursue a higher degree after high school. Social capital plays a fundamental role in academic achievement and students of lower socioeconomic status must find different means to achieving "traditional" pathways of success (Palmer, R. T., & Maramba, D. C., 2015; Museus & Mueller, 2018). Lack of social capital compounded with a racialized identity sets first-generation Vietnamese American students in a unique and unacknowledged realm within educational spaces. While they are presumed to do well because of their racialized identities, educational attainment, or the lack thereof, reflects a problem that goes unseen. My project will investigate educational attainment and the relationships between effort, achievement, racialized identities, and tracking. My research questions are: What obstacles do Vietnamese American students experience during their time in high school and how do these experiences affect their post-secondary educational career? What effect does social capital have on academic achievement, persistence, and aspirations?