Date

5-13-2020

Description

Scholars have overlooked the effect of the Russo-Japanese War and its pivotal role in U.S. Naval policy, strategy, and tactics. The Russo-Japanese War was the first instance where the U.S. Navy paid attention to Japan because Japan's naval and ground forces had defeated a major western power. After 1904, the U.S. Navy had to consider Japan a viable threat to American interests. The U.S. Navy's war planning activities in relation to Japan have attracted considerable attention by historians. Scholars have published elaborate studies about the development of War Plan Orange (1911-1941) detailing how the United States might fight Japan. Scholars have also focused on the Great White Fleet (1907-09), wherein President Roosevelt dispatched the Navy on a global cruise to demonstrate to Japan the United States' peaceful intentions but also U.S. capacities for defense. Japan was an intensifying concern of the U.S. Navy in the early twentieth century. Scholars have not acknowledged that Japan's conduct in war with Russia awakened the U.S. Navy to the urgent threat its armed forces posed to American national security in the Pacific. I have researched the archives at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. Those materials I investigated include: papers from the General Board, lectures offered by senior officers, and student papers written by junior officers. The personnel at the college influenced policy and strategy in the decades preceding World War II. My research into the pivotal but misunderstood role of the Russo-Japanese War will become the basis of my oral presentation.

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May 13th, 12:00 AM

How the Russo-Japanese War Affected U.S Naval and Marine Corps Policy, Strategy, and Tactics from 1904 to 1924

Scholars have overlooked the effect of the Russo-Japanese War and its pivotal role in U.S. Naval policy, strategy, and tactics. The Russo-Japanese War was the first instance where the U.S. Navy paid attention to Japan because Japan's naval and ground forces had defeated a major western power. After 1904, the U.S. Navy had to consider Japan a viable threat to American interests. The U.S. Navy's war planning activities in relation to Japan have attracted considerable attention by historians. Scholars have published elaborate studies about the development of War Plan Orange (1911-1941) detailing how the United States might fight Japan. Scholars have also focused on the Great White Fleet (1907-09), wherein President Roosevelt dispatched the Navy on a global cruise to demonstrate to Japan the United States' peaceful intentions but also U.S. capacities for defense. Japan was an intensifying concern of the U.S. Navy in the early twentieth century. Scholars have not acknowledged that Japan's conduct in war with Russia awakened the U.S. Navy to the urgent threat its armed forces posed to American national security in the Pacific. I have researched the archives at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. Those materials I investigated include: papers from the General Board, lectures offered by senior officers, and student papers written by junior officers. The personnel at the college influenced policy and strategy in the decades preceding World War II. My research into the pivotal but misunderstood role of the Russo-Japanese War will become the basis of my oral presentation.