Date

5-12-2020

Description

Abortion policy in the United States varies greatly from state to state. The general understanding is that states controlled by Democrats are friendly towards abortion and states controlled by Republicans are more hostile towards abortion rights. In the research paper, this is displayed by the state of Oklahoma. However, the states of Rhode Island and Montana both defy this generally accepted trend. Rhode Island is a Democratically controlled state with a strong history of abortion restrictions, while Montana is a Republican-controlled state with a track record of more lax policy on reproductive rights. This research paper delves into the political cultures of the states in order to find an explanation for these anomalies and the results show deeper reasoning than simply partisan control. In each state, subjects such as the importance of religion by state, the political traditions, and the future of reproductive rights in the states of Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Montana vary, and yet are critical in understanding why these states hold the policies they do.

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May 12th, 12:00 AM

Political Culture and Abortion Policy

Abortion policy in the United States varies greatly from state to state. The general understanding is that states controlled by Democrats are friendly towards abortion and states controlled by Republicans are more hostile towards abortion rights. In the research paper, this is displayed by the state of Oklahoma. However, the states of Rhode Island and Montana both defy this generally accepted trend. Rhode Island is a Democratically controlled state with a strong history of abortion restrictions, while Montana is a Republican-controlled state with a track record of more lax policy on reproductive rights. This research paper delves into the political cultures of the states in order to find an explanation for these anomalies and the results show deeper reasoning than simply partisan control. In each state, subjects such as the importance of religion by state, the political traditions, and the future of reproductive rights in the states of Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Montana vary, and yet are critical in understanding why these states hold the policies they do.