The History of Sorjuanismo: Tracing the Commitment of Mexico's Tenth Muse

Uriel Lopez-Serrano, Bowdoin College

Description

Abortion has long had a contentious history in the United States and it very much so an issue that is so tied in religion, politics and structural violence. What it even more interesting is how the fictionalized portrayal of woman seeking and preforming abortions comes very making their bodies a political but also demonstrates that a woman's body once pregnant becomes public and therefore subject to all of the pressure, policies and criticisms of those around her especially when she decides to have an abortion. The decision for abortion allows others to not only strip the feminine body of autonomy but also contribute to the dynamism of the political body.This essay explores the construction of the politicized pregnancy through three movies, Vera Drake, If These Walls Could Talk, and Obvious Child by examining their narratives that are centered around choice and an attempt at independence from the state. These movies offer an unapologetic look at what it means to choose what is best for oneself regardless of what the state or outside sources insist is the proper decision. These movies will be assessed and critiqued against the theory specifically Paul Farmer, Emily Martin, Deborah Gorgon and Michael Foucault.

 
May 6th, 12:00 AM

The History of Sorjuanismo: Tracing the Commitment of Mexico's Tenth Muse

Abortion has long had a contentious history in the United States and it very much so an issue that is so tied in religion, politics and structural violence. What it even more interesting is how the fictionalized portrayal of woman seeking and preforming abortions comes very making their bodies a political but also demonstrates that a woman's body once pregnant becomes public and therefore subject to all of the pressure, policies and criticisms of those around her especially when she decides to have an abortion. The decision for abortion allows others to not only strip the feminine body of autonomy but also contribute to the dynamism of the political body.This essay explores the construction of the politicized pregnancy through three movies, Vera Drake, If These Walls Could Talk, and Obvious Child by examining their narratives that are centered around choice and an attempt at independence from the state. These movies offer an unapologetic look at what it means to choose what is best for oneself regardless of what the state or outside sources insist is the proper decision. These movies will be assessed and critiqued against the theory specifically Paul Farmer, Emily Martin, Deborah Gorgon and Michael Foucault.