Date

5-6-2020

Description

My research project provides insight into the privatization of the public Detroit General Hospital. I examine the reasoning and objections behind giving the only public hospital at the time, the Detroit General Hospital, to a private company, the Detroit Medical Center. I also examine if the argument for privatization of hospital management in Detroit is similar to the argument in education that creating charter schools would create healthy competition and improve the overall quality of education in Detroit. The benefits of privatization were more efficient care, less costs for the city government, more up-to-date equipment, and more competition between hospitals (which supposedly would lead to better care). However, health care has become more expensive, there has been a loss of public jobs, disassembling of unions, and a larger health equity gap. I discuss the Urban Health Equity Response Tool with Community-Based Participatory Research to better understand the health disparities among residents of Detroit. As a whole, Detroit is in one of the best situations to learn from its mistakes in order to better its future. The results of tools such as Urban HEART can contribute to conversations on how to improve healthcare in the city of Detroit.

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Paving a Path to Privatization: The History of Healthcare in Detroit

My research project provides insight into the privatization of the public Detroit General Hospital. I examine the reasoning and objections behind giving the only public hospital at the time, the Detroit General Hospital, to a private company, the Detroit Medical Center. I also examine if the argument for privatization of hospital management in Detroit is similar to the argument in education that creating charter schools would create healthy competition and improve the overall quality of education in Detroit. The benefits of privatization were more efficient care, less costs for the city government, more up-to-date equipment, and more competition between hospitals (which supposedly would lead to better care). However, health care has become more expensive, there has been a loss of public jobs, disassembling of unions, and a larger health equity gap. I discuss the Urban Health Equity Response Tool with Community-Based Participatory Research to better understand the health disparities among residents of Detroit. As a whole, Detroit is in one of the best situations to learn from its mistakes in order to better its future. The results of tools such as Urban HEART can contribute to conversations on how to improve healthcare in the city of Detroit.