Date

5-7-2020

Description

This interdisciplinary project uses both literary theory and creative technology in order to address the fascinating gender politics and questions raised in Jeffrey Eugenide's 1994 novel, The Virgin Suicides. In this novel, a group of adolescent boys describes their deep infatuation with the depressed Lisbon sisters. There are be two outcomes of this project: an analytical essay and a website which will portray the theories of the essay. The thesis of this project is that the boys who observe the Lisbon girls are curious about and envious of the Lisbon girls' femininity, yet their society forces them to view the girls as sexual objects and therefore does not allow to understand the girls as human beings. I will derive this psychoanalytic framework from the theories of Sigmund Freud's The Uncanny, Jaques Lacan's "gaze" concept, and Laura Muley's "male gaze". In the interactive website portion, I will create a tour of the Lisbons' home as a metaphor for the boys' experience of their femininity. The website will be comprised of scenes, which l have illustrated myself, of the Lisbon girls existing outside the male gaze which the boys use to fetishize them; instead, they exist as women with flaws and human essences rather than angels. This project also implements the concepts of digital humanities, by juxtaposing these realistic scenes with the boys' fetishizing passages from the novel. In essence, this project uses multimodal analysis to critique and question how society teaches young people to project their gender expression and identity.

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May 7th, 12:00 AM

The House of Our Bathroom Fantasies: Uncanny Male Gaze in The Virgin Suicides

This interdisciplinary project uses both literary theory and creative technology in order to address the fascinating gender politics and questions raised in Jeffrey Eugenide's 1994 novel, The Virgin Suicides. In this novel, a group of adolescent boys describes their deep infatuation with the depressed Lisbon sisters. There are be two outcomes of this project: an analytical essay and a website which will portray the theories of the essay. The thesis of this project is that the boys who observe the Lisbon girls are curious about and envious of the Lisbon girls' femininity, yet their society forces them to view the girls as sexual objects and therefore does not allow to understand the girls as human beings. I will derive this psychoanalytic framework from the theories of Sigmund Freud's The Uncanny, Jaques Lacan's "gaze" concept, and Laura Muley's "male gaze". In the interactive website portion, I will create a tour of the Lisbons' home as a metaphor for the boys' experience of their femininity. The website will be comprised of scenes, which l have illustrated myself, of the Lisbon girls existing outside the male gaze which the boys use to fetishize them; instead, they exist as women with flaws and human essences rather than angels. This project also implements the concepts of digital humanities, by juxtaposing these realistic scenes with the boys' fetishizing passages from the novel. In essence, this project uses multimodal analysis to critique and question how society teaches young people to project their gender expression and identity.