Date

5-6-2020

Description

The AIDS crisis was a major cause of a new wave of gay rights activism. With the AIDS crisis, the activist community saw groups like ACT UP and the Gay Men's Health Crisis emerge. As the crisis grew we saw the breaking off of groups into more specialized activist groups like the Treatment Action Group. The Treatment Action Group or TAG was founded in 1991 during the epidemic. At the time of its founding AIDS was the leading cause of death in men ages 25 to 44. There were also no FDA approved combination treatments for AIDS/HIV at this time. This organization's goal was to help fund treatment and watch over trials to ensure they were ethical and safe. However, during the time before TAG, activists and government officials were having difficulty working together for various reasons. Treatment Action Group's use of assimilation activism rather than queer activism allowed them to be a part of the government response to the disease. By analyzing the tactics of TAG versus ACT UP, this paper presents a contemporary analysis of how the use of assimilation activism by the Treatment Action Group benefited the group much more in receiving government response than the use of queer activism by organizations like ACT UP.

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Queer Men in Suits: TAG, ACT UP, and AIDS

The AIDS crisis was a major cause of a new wave of gay rights activism. With the AIDS crisis, the activist community saw groups like ACT UP and the Gay Men's Health Crisis emerge. As the crisis grew we saw the breaking off of groups into more specialized activist groups like the Treatment Action Group. The Treatment Action Group or TAG was founded in 1991 during the epidemic. At the time of its founding AIDS was the leading cause of death in men ages 25 to 44. There were also no FDA approved combination treatments for AIDS/HIV at this time. This organization's goal was to help fund treatment and watch over trials to ensure they were ethical and safe. However, during the time before TAG, activists and government officials were having difficulty working together for various reasons. Treatment Action Group's use of assimilation activism rather than queer activism allowed them to be a part of the government response to the disease. By analyzing the tactics of TAG versus ACT UP, this paper presents a contemporary analysis of how the use of assimilation activism by the Treatment Action Group benefited the group much more in receiving government response than the use of queer activism by organizations like ACT UP.