Date

5-4-2020

Description

This study explores to what extent self-perception of decision-making in dance improvisation can be orchestrated and choreographed by the performer and the environment. In this presentation, I will argue that the practice of dance and movement improvisation is an excellent place to ask questions about learning and knowing. Pulling from John Dewey's theories of education and the concept of participatory sense-making, I will discuss learning and knowing as concepts that exist in transactional spaces. In our study of improvisation, I, along with several dancers, have explored that human knowing is at times ineffable but perceivable. Using the body as our platform, we rehearsed hour-long improvisational movement scores for six months with several formal performances along the way. Including the body in this practice let us engage in an interdisciplinary approach to the philosophy of consciousness and learning. This study illustrates through improvisational performance and non-performative physicality that there is a deeper sort of corporeal knowing present in human interaction beyond commonly definable cognition. I will discuss this claim through Dewey's concept of "renewal of life through transmission", the idea of participatory sense-making from the field of enactive cognitive science, and through the lens of performance studies. Arriving at the conclusion that engaging in embodied research processes to explore questions of knowing and learning in philosophy, cognition, and performance studies is vital towards the advancement of these fields.

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May 4th, 12:00 AM

Using the Body as Our Platform: Learning and Knowing Through Embodied Research Practices

This study explores to what extent self-perception of decision-making in dance improvisation can be orchestrated and choreographed by the performer and the environment. In this presentation, I will argue that the practice of dance and movement improvisation is an excellent place to ask questions about learning and knowing. Pulling from John Dewey's theories of education and the concept of participatory sense-making, I will discuss learning and knowing as concepts that exist in transactional spaces. In our study of improvisation, I, along with several dancers, have explored that human knowing is at times ineffable but perceivable. Using the body as our platform, we rehearsed hour-long improvisational movement scores for six months with several formal performances along the way. Including the body in this practice let us engage in an interdisciplinary approach to the philosophy of consciousness and learning. This study illustrates through improvisational performance and non-performative physicality that there is a deeper sort of corporeal knowing present in human interaction beyond commonly definable cognition. I will discuss this claim through Dewey's concept of "renewal of life through transmission", the idea of participatory sense-making from the field of enactive cognitive science, and through the lens of performance studies. Arriving at the conclusion that engaging in embodied research processes to explore questions of knowing and learning in philosophy, cognition, and performance studies is vital towards the advancement of these fields.