Date

5-5-2020

Description

Governor William Livingston was one of the first founders of the New York Society Library, first-elected governor of New Jersey, and author of weekly essays in "The Independent Reflector." Livingston's extensive collection of books spans a multitude of genres. Based on his works, Livingston concluded that his ideal image of an exemplary woman would be one educated, but not superseding or equivalent to him in intellect. In Philosophical Solitude, Livingston stated "Sublime her reason, and her native wit/ Unstain'd with pedantry, and low conceit." One can determine the influence Livingston's work had upon his families' educational upbringing and exposure that women had to various topics. The eighteenth-century expected women to read cover standards and ideals assumed for women such as etiquette and religion. Through a gender analysis of novels included in William Livingston's collections, letters, published writings, and the New York Society Library, one can examine and compare them to the books and readings designated for women in eighteenth-century America.

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May 5th, 12:00 AM

A Gender Analysis of William Livingston's Library Collection Examining Readings for Women in Eighteenth- Century America

Governor William Livingston was one of the first founders of the New York Society Library, first-elected governor of New Jersey, and author of weekly essays in "The Independent Reflector." Livingston's extensive collection of books spans a multitude of genres. Based on his works, Livingston concluded that his ideal image of an exemplary woman would be one educated, but not superseding or equivalent to him in intellect. In Philosophical Solitude, Livingston stated "Sublime her reason, and her native wit/ Unstain'd with pedantry, and low conceit." One can determine the influence Livingston's work had upon his families' educational upbringing and exposure that women had to various topics. The eighteenth-century expected women to read cover standards and ideals assumed for women such as etiquette and religion. Through a gender analysis of novels included in William Livingston's collections, letters, published writings, and the New York Society Library, one can examine and compare them to the books and readings designated for women in eighteenth-century America.