Presenter Information

Sue-Yeon Ryu, Ohio UniversityFollow

Date

4-28-2020

Description

As cities become increasingly ubiquitous in this globalized world, so do the social and geographic separations within those urban landscapes. Engaging a conceptual framework of space and place, this anthropological research project seeks to first locate and interpret the marginalized neighborhood of Serrinha as a place in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. After establishing a background for the existence of the neighborhood, this study uses concepts from the anthropology of materiality and an interdisciplinary understanding of place attachment to examine how the social and physical dimensions of place coalesce within Serrinha. Scannell and Gifford's tripartite model of place attachment frames participant observation experiences in the community and data from semi-structured interviews with Serrinha residents. Through this framework, I find the unification of "physical-spatial and human-social aspects of place" (Bernardo and Palma-Oliveira 2016, 239) in the brick that creates many Serrinha houses. The Serrinha house and the brick that makes it both: symbolize social strategies as residents manifest their kinship networks, and embody global patterns (even hostile ideologies). Ultimately, this research aims to explore how autoconstruction, or self-building, of the house functions as the psychological process variable of the tripartite model--the variable that has been studied least in regards to place attachment.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Why We Love it Here: Exploration of Affection and Place Attachment in the Brazilian Periphery

As cities become increasingly ubiquitous in this globalized world, so do the social and geographic separations within those urban landscapes. Engaging a conceptual framework of space and place, this anthropological research project seeks to first locate and interpret the marginalized neighborhood of Serrinha as a place in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. After establishing a background for the existence of the neighborhood, this study uses concepts from the anthropology of materiality and an interdisciplinary understanding of place attachment to examine how the social and physical dimensions of place coalesce within Serrinha. Scannell and Gifford's tripartite model of place attachment frames participant observation experiences in the community and data from semi-structured interviews with Serrinha residents. Through this framework, I find the unification of "physical-spatial and human-social aspects of place" (Bernardo and Palma-Oliveira 2016, 239) in the brick that creates many Serrinha houses. The Serrinha house and the brick that makes it both: symbolize social strategies as residents manifest their kinship networks, and embody global patterns (even hostile ideologies). Ultimately, this research aims to explore how autoconstruction, or self-building, of the house functions as the psychological process variable of the tripartite model--the variable that has been studied least in regards to place attachment.