Date

4-28-2020

Description

Over the past few decades, the definition of literacy and what it has meant to be considered "literate" has undergone substantial transformation that has distinguished it from solely being able to read or write. Specifically, a new approach to literacy education has been created called the "New Literacy Studies" (NLS) which interrogates the standards that qualifies one as being satisfactory literate against the sociocultural influences that can impact an individual's literate abilities. This is an interdisciplinary approach to literacy studies that collectively calls upon the research of sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists in addition to literacy scholars and educators, but has yet to be formally introduced to literacy education. In this paper, I attempt to create a sense of urgency for the decades old theoretical framework of the NLS to be finally integrated into literacy education as more opportunities for disadvantaged students to increase their social mobility presents itself in education. How can we cultivate these students' creative abilities if we are denying them the environments and representation of their identities in those spaces that they learn best in? I have also done some additional research to gain insight from students' hailing from underrepresented populations in assessing their experiences with education and their needs for being able to acquire literacy to the best of their abilities.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Putting It Into Practice: Moving Forward with Integrating the New Literacy Studies into Literacy Education Once and For All

Over the past few decades, the definition of literacy and what it has meant to be considered "literate" has undergone substantial transformation that has distinguished it from solely being able to read or write. Specifically, a new approach to literacy education has been created called the "New Literacy Studies" (NLS) which interrogates the standards that qualifies one as being satisfactory literate against the sociocultural influences that can impact an individual's literate abilities. This is an interdisciplinary approach to literacy studies that collectively calls upon the research of sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists in addition to literacy scholars and educators, but has yet to be formally introduced to literacy education. In this paper, I attempt to create a sense of urgency for the decades old theoretical framework of the NLS to be finally integrated into literacy education as more opportunities for disadvantaged students to increase their social mobility presents itself in education. How can we cultivate these students' creative abilities if we are denying them the environments and representation of their identities in those spaces that they learn best in? I have also done some additional research to gain insight from students' hailing from underrepresented populations in assessing their experiences with education and their needs for being able to acquire literacy to the best of their abilities.