Date

5-1-2020

Description

My research presentation magnifies how contemporary Central American undergraduate students at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) are claiming the erasure of their ethnic and racial identities as an underestimate public invisibility at this campus. The public and normative erasure of UCI undergraduate students' ethnic identity is experienced as an emotionally stressful form of invisibility when interacting socially, completing courses, and engaging in other forms of everyday student life at UCI. Fleshing out the public and undocumented nuances and outcomes of this underestimated undergraduate student experience will demonstrate that Central American undergraduate students are among the most publicly marginalized students at this campus, as well as conflicted about how to discuss their educational experience. In terms of focus on student enrollment at the University of California, Irvine, the focus will be on students ranging from First year-Fourth/Fifth year in order to better gauge how students are navigating through the college experience while also being expressive of their ethnic identity. Oftentimes being denied an opportunity to lay claim to their ethnic identity in personally meaningful ways or intellectually in the form of courses and programming at this campus is not only difficult to face but painful to address and discuss. After conducting surveys with Central American undergraduate students, as well as textual analysis of their writing on their feelings of erasure at UCI, I look forward to sharing their emotional insights on an underestimated student experience and reality.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Underestimated Erasures: Central American Undergraduate Student Public Invisibility at the University of California, Irvine

My research presentation magnifies how contemporary Central American undergraduate students at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) are claiming the erasure of their ethnic and racial identities as an underestimate public invisibility at this campus. The public and normative erasure of UCI undergraduate students' ethnic identity is experienced as an emotionally stressful form of invisibility when interacting socially, completing courses, and engaging in other forms of everyday student life at UCI. Fleshing out the public and undocumented nuances and outcomes of this underestimated undergraduate student experience will demonstrate that Central American undergraduate students are among the most publicly marginalized students at this campus, as well as conflicted about how to discuss their educational experience. In terms of focus on student enrollment at the University of California, Irvine, the focus will be on students ranging from First year-Fourth/Fifth year in order to better gauge how students are navigating through the college experience while also being expressive of their ethnic identity. Oftentimes being denied an opportunity to lay claim to their ethnic identity in personally meaningful ways or intellectually in the form of courses and programming at this campus is not only difficult to face but painful to address and discuss. After conducting surveys with Central American undergraduate students, as well as textual analysis of their writing on their feelings of erasure at UCI, I look forward to sharing their emotional insights on an underestimated student experience and reality.