Date

5-1-2020

Description

Historical evidence has shown that issues of skin tone (e.g., the lightness or darkness of one's skin color) are embedded in the lives of African Americans and Latinos (Childs, 2005; Cobas & Qian, 2004; Landor & McNeil Smith, 2019). Skin tone bias originates from the idea that European phenotypic characteristics (e.g., lighter skin, thinner lips, and straighter hair) are more desirable than the other end of the spectrum (darker skin, fuller lips, kinkier hair) (Bany, Feliciano, Robnett, 2014). Research suggests that European phenotypic characteristics are considered more desirable when selecting a partner (Hunter, 2007; Landor, 2017). Using data from a sample of 145 African American and Latino college students (African American, n = 91 or Latino, n = 54) who participated in the Health and Relationships During College (HRDC) study, I conducted hierarchical regression analyses to determine how European phenotypic characteristics (e.g., lighter skin, thinner lips, lighter hair color, and straighter hair) influences interracial mating and dating attitudes for African American and Latino college students. Results showed that African American and Latino college students with thicker lips were more likely to report wanting to have a child (β= .28, p < .01) with a White individual. Additional findings from the analyses show that phenotypic characteristics influence interracial dating and mating attitudes of African American and Latino college students. Understanding interracial dating and mating attitudes among African American and Latino college students can provide insight for professionals as to whether these attitudes are based on preference or prejudicial beliefs.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Preference or Prejudice?: Does Phenotype Influence Interracial Dating and Mating Attitudes among African American and Latino college students?

Historical evidence has shown that issues of skin tone (e.g., the lightness or darkness of one's skin color) are embedded in the lives of African Americans and Latinos (Childs, 2005; Cobas & Qian, 2004; Landor & McNeil Smith, 2019). Skin tone bias originates from the idea that European phenotypic characteristics (e.g., lighter skin, thinner lips, and straighter hair) are more desirable than the other end of the spectrum (darker skin, fuller lips, kinkier hair) (Bany, Feliciano, Robnett, 2014). Research suggests that European phenotypic characteristics are considered more desirable when selecting a partner (Hunter, 2007; Landor, 2017). Using data from a sample of 145 African American and Latino college students (African American, n = 91 or Latino, n = 54) who participated in the Health and Relationships During College (HRDC) study, I conducted hierarchical regression analyses to determine how European phenotypic characteristics (e.g., lighter skin, thinner lips, lighter hair color, and straighter hair) influences interracial mating and dating attitudes for African American and Latino college students. Results showed that African American and Latino college students with thicker lips were more likely to report wanting to have a child (β= .28, p < .01) with a White individual. Additional findings from the analyses show that phenotypic characteristics influence interracial dating and mating attitudes of African American and Latino college students. Understanding interracial dating and mating attitudes among African American and Latino college students can provide insight for professionals as to whether these attitudes are based on preference or prejudicial beliefs.