Date

5-1-2020

Description

North American expatriates in Mexico often live in enclave communities at a fraction of what it would cost in the US or Canada. Despite living in Mexico for many years, some expatriates are poorly integrated into Mexican culture and society. This integration is made more difficult because many are unable to speak Spanish fluently. Instead, they rely on English language virtual communities on Facebook. The function of these virtual communities is to help expatriates navigate life in Mexico. While scholars have explored the intersections of communication and interculturalism in expatriate communities, comparatively few have explored how the internet and the presentation of self on social media (specifically Facebook) influence the relative integration or isolation of expatriates. First, using qualitative discourse analysis, this study will focus on ten major Facebook groups for expatriates living in Jalisco to attempt to determine the dominant misconceptions depicted in virtual communities about Mexico, including expat's self-perception of intercultural competence (or lack thereof). Secondarily, this study seeks to compare narratives depicted in virtual communities with the ones given to researchers in more formal interview settings.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Virtual Communities: A Discourse Analysis of Facebook Groups for Expatriates in Jalisco

North American expatriates in Mexico often live in enclave communities at a fraction of what it would cost in the US or Canada. Despite living in Mexico for many years, some expatriates are poorly integrated into Mexican culture and society. This integration is made more difficult because many are unable to speak Spanish fluently. Instead, they rely on English language virtual communities on Facebook. The function of these virtual communities is to help expatriates navigate life in Mexico. While scholars have explored the intersections of communication and interculturalism in expatriate communities, comparatively few have explored how the internet and the presentation of self on social media (specifically Facebook) influence the relative integration or isolation of expatriates. First, using qualitative discourse analysis, this study will focus on ten major Facebook groups for expatriates living in Jalisco to attempt to determine the dominant misconceptions depicted in virtual communities about Mexico, including expat's self-perception of intercultural competence (or lack thereof). Secondarily, this study seeks to compare narratives depicted in virtual communities with the ones given to researchers in more formal interview settings.