Date

5-1-2020

Description

This paper explores the question of Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau's influence on subsequent cinematic versions of Dracula, namely Francis Ford Coppola's 1992 film "Bram Stoker's Dracula." Scholars claim that Murnau's film is influential, and my paper aims to measure the extent to which stylistic and narrative aspects found in the film,but not present in or suggested by the novel, can be seen in subsequent retellings on screen.

Seventy years after "Nosferatu" Coppola released his Dracula film, which was produced and marketed as the closest cinematic retelling of Stoker's novel. Murnau's "Nosferatu," on the other hand, was an unauthorized adaptation that deviated heavily from Stoker's novel. Due to this, Murnau's film had changed narrative and stylistic elements in order to avoid possible legal repercussions. The extremely different relationship these two films have to the source material would suggest two extremely different films in terms of style and narrative. However, Coppola has stated of "Nosferatu," that it "is probably the greatest film made on the Dracula story." Through close stylistic analysis, I examine the extent of stylistic influence that Murnau, and his unauthorized film, have in Coppola's allegedly authentic retelling.

My research also considers "Nosferatu" within the context of Murnau as an auteur and German Expressionism as a stylistic movement. I connect the stylistic traces of German Expressionism and Murnau present in "Nosferatu" to those present in Coppola's "Bram Stoker's Dracula."

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

"Nosferatu's Shadow": Stylistic Traces of Murnau in Coppola's "Bram Stoker's Dracula"

This paper explores the question of Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau's influence on subsequent cinematic versions of Dracula, namely Francis Ford Coppola's 1992 film "Bram Stoker's Dracula." Scholars claim that Murnau's film is influential, and my paper aims to measure the extent to which stylistic and narrative aspects found in the film,but not present in or suggested by the novel, can be seen in subsequent retellings on screen.

Seventy years after "Nosferatu" Coppola released his Dracula film, which was produced and marketed as the closest cinematic retelling of Stoker's novel. Murnau's "Nosferatu," on the other hand, was an unauthorized adaptation that deviated heavily from Stoker's novel. Due to this, Murnau's film had changed narrative and stylistic elements in order to avoid possible legal repercussions. The extremely different relationship these two films have to the source material would suggest two extremely different films in terms of style and narrative. However, Coppola has stated of "Nosferatu," that it "is probably the greatest film made on the Dracula story." Through close stylistic analysis, I examine the extent of stylistic influence that Murnau, and his unauthorized film, have in Coppola's allegedly authentic retelling.

My research also considers "Nosferatu" within the context of Murnau as an auteur and German Expressionism as a stylistic movement. I connect the stylistic traces of German Expressionism and Murnau present in "Nosferatu" to those present in Coppola's "Bram Stoker's Dracula."