Public Health in Uganda's Post-Colonial Period

Lydia Fulton, Southern Illinois University of Edwardsville
Tyler Gleadle, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Description

Our group aims to provide a historical and cultural view of medicine in Uganda during the post-colonial period based off interviews done in the field by Dr. Kathleen Vongsathorn. Broadly speaking the group will be examining public health in Uganda, the role of missionary medicine during this period, traditional healing in Uganda, as well as the relationship between biomedicine and traditional medicine and how these methodologies interacted. We will also examine the role of traditional healers and birth attendants and what capacity they played in the continuum of public health in Uganda, as well as how individuals in Uganda themselves interacted with healing systems and public health. On top of providing an individual view of what public health was like in Uganda, we hope to also illustrate some of the structural and organizational methodologies employed in the name of public health during this period. By examining a variety of perspectives on health, our group hopes to provide a broader historical understanding of public health in post-colonial Uganda and how medicine helped influence a variety of decisions individuals made every day.

I am a second-year student at Southern Illinois University of Edwardsville studying biology with intent to pursue an M.D. degree. My area of research encompasses midwifery and traditional medicine as practiced by traditional birth attendants. My work analyzes the relationship between these two health care options and the community to understand the current state of Uganda's maternal and child health care options.

 
May 1st, 12:00 AM

Public Health in Uganda's Post-Colonial Period

Our group aims to provide a historical and cultural view of medicine in Uganda during the post-colonial period based off interviews done in the field by Dr. Kathleen Vongsathorn. Broadly speaking the group will be examining public health in Uganda, the role of missionary medicine during this period, traditional healing in Uganda, as well as the relationship between biomedicine and traditional medicine and how these methodologies interacted. We will also examine the role of traditional healers and birth attendants and what capacity they played in the continuum of public health in Uganda, as well as how individuals in Uganda themselves interacted with healing systems and public health. On top of providing an individual view of what public health was like in Uganda, we hope to also illustrate some of the structural and organizational methodologies employed in the name of public health during this period. By examining a variety of perspectives on health, our group hopes to provide a broader historical understanding of public health in post-colonial Uganda and how medicine helped influence a variety of decisions individuals made every day.

I am a second-year student at Southern Illinois University of Edwardsville studying biology with intent to pursue an M.D. degree. My area of research encompasses midwifery and traditional medicine as practiced by traditional birth attendants. My work analyzes the relationship between these two health care options and the community to understand the current state of Uganda's maternal and child health care options.