Date

5-1-2020

Description

The news cycle as a whole has previously been studied to some extent, answering questions about how Americans choose to get their news and the news cycle of a hoax (Agiesta 2014; Lapoe 2013). However, a study of the news cycle specifically focused on cultural heritage conservation has not been undertaken before. While art and culture has been included as an aspect of the news cycle in other studies, the specific focus on cultural heritage conservation here is what makes this study unique.

In order to understand how the news cycle includes cultural heritage conservation, this research took two phases, one quantitative and one qualitative. First, I compiled a literature review of over 1,000 news articles written in the last three years. Second, I interviewed journalists, editors, and conservators about their experiences with the news cycle. I hypothesized that news stories about a famous artist would receive more news coverage. Here, a story is defined as the overarching topic and news coverage is defined as the number of articles published about it by a news organization. The literature review showed that most stories that included a famous artist, a new discovery, the process of conservation itself, or a technological advancement received more news coverage. The interviews confirmed and expanded upon this idea, but not without nuance. In general, editors are looking to publish articles that have a strong narrative, making sure that each story feels unique. Conservation controversies (think Ecce Homo) can only be written about so many times!

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Extra! Extra! Read All About It: Cultural Heritage Conservation in the Media

The news cycle as a whole has previously been studied to some extent, answering questions about how Americans choose to get their news and the news cycle of a hoax (Agiesta 2014; Lapoe 2013). However, a study of the news cycle specifically focused on cultural heritage conservation has not been undertaken before. While art and culture has been included as an aspect of the news cycle in other studies, the specific focus on cultural heritage conservation here is what makes this study unique.

In order to understand how the news cycle includes cultural heritage conservation, this research took two phases, one quantitative and one qualitative. First, I compiled a literature review of over 1,000 news articles written in the last three years. Second, I interviewed journalists, editors, and conservators about their experiences with the news cycle. I hypothesized that news stories about a famous artist would receive more news coverage. Here, a story is defined as the overarching topic and news coverage is defined as the number of articles published about it by a news organization. The literature review showed that most stories that included a famous artist, a new discovery, the process of conservation itself, or a technological advancement received more news coverage. The interviews confirmed and expanded upon this idea, but not without nuance. In general, editors are looking to publish articles that have a strong narrative, making sure that each story feels unique. Conservation controversies (think Ecce Homo) can only be written about so many times!