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Date

5-1-2020

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Recent readings of "Hamlet" attempt to reconcile the titular Dane by viewing him as a meditation on negativity or nothingness. I see the play's intense focus on his iconoclasm not as a reflection upon an ontological nothingness in the subject, but as an inevitable venture into this nothingness made possible only by the reader's engagement with the text. By leveraging Lacan's theories of the subject, along with the Ljubljana school's interpretations, my research re-situates "Hamlet" at a new mode of reading: metametatextuality. I introduce metametatextuality, a mode of reading necessitated by Hamlet's soliloquized subjectivity, by implicating the reader as an inevitable yet ontologically impossible source of the tension and action within the drama. This paper reads scenes 1.5 and 3.1 alongside paradigmatic works of the psychoanalytic and philosophic literature. Such reading accesses the elusive vacillations of the Lacanian Hamlet and opens the way to an understanding of "Hamlet" beyond a mere reflection or correlate to the subject's nothingness: an experience of nothing itself.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

In Another Time: Hamlet, Lacan, Ljubljana, and Metametatextuality

Recent readings of "Hamlet" attempt to reconcile the titular Dane by viewing him as a meditation on negativity or nothingness. I see the play's intense focus on his iconoclasm not as a reflection upon an ontological nothingness in the subject, but as an inevitable venture into this nothingness made possible only by the reader's engagement with the text. By leveraging Lacan's theories of the subject, along with the Ljubljana school's interpretations, my research re-situates "Hamlet" at a new mode of reading: metametatextuality. I introduce metametatextuality, a mode of reading necessitated by Hamlet's soliloquized subjectivity, by implicating the reader as an inevitable yet ontologically impossible source of the tension and action within the drama. This paper reads scenes 1.5 and 3.1 alongside paradigmatic works of the psychoanalytic and philosophic literature. Such reading accesses the elusive vacillations of the Lacanian Hamlet and opens the way to an understanding of "Hamlet" beyond a mere reflection or correlate to the subject's nothingness: an experience of nothing itself.