Date

5-1-2020

Description

The French colonization of Haiti is a subject birthed out of fierce tragedy and inexplicable greed, an open wound that has and continues to leave its devastating mark on Haiti and those who've lived under its influence. It is this tragedy that serves as the basis for Cuban author Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World (1949), a novel that explores the impacts of colonialism and the events surrounding/following the Haitian Revolution of 1804 through the varying gendered perspectives of both Haitian slaves, French aristocrats, and newly implemented members of the Haitian aristocracy. Carpentier's masterful use of his narrative focal points acts as a foundation for the connection he establishes between the idea of masculinity, or gendered concepts as a whole, and an individual's sensory experiences. Particularly, this research focuses on the novel's use of gendered auditory signals as a method of exploring the differing relationships/perspectives that colonizers and colonized individuals have towards masculinity. A close reading of this primary text, put into conversation with postcolonial theory, reveals that colonialism has a significant impact upon the way that individuals both perceive masculinity and respond to it in the world around them. This research's observations about the relationship between sound, colonialism, and masculinity strives to present audiences with the tools for dissecting the foundation of masculinity within their own societies and understanding how the perpetuation of hyper masculinity is harmful to global societies at large.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Catastrophic Colonialism: An Examination of Masculinity in Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World

The French colonization of Haiti is a subject birthed out of fierce tragedy and inexplicable greed, an open wound that has and continues to leave its devastating mark on Haiti and those who've lived under its influence. It is this tragedy that serves as the basis for Cuban author Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World (1949), a novel that explores the impacts of colonialism and the events surrounding/following the Haitian Revolution of 1804 through the varying gendered perspectives of both Haitian slaves, French aristocrats, and newly implemented members of the Haitian aristocracy. Carpentier's masterful use of his narrative focal points acts as a foundation for the connection he establishes between the idea of masculinity, or gendered concepts as a whole, and an individual's sensory experiences. Particularly, this research focuses on the novel's use of gendered auditory signals as a method of exploring the differing relationships/perspectives that colonizers and colonized individuals have towards masculinity. A close reading of this primary text, put into conversation with postcolonial theory, reveals that colonialism has a significant impact upon the way that individuals both perceive masculinity and respond to it in the world around them. This research's observations about the relationship between sound, colonialism, and masculinity strives to present audiences with the tools for dissecting the foundation of masculinity within their own societies and understanding how the perpetuation of hyper masculinity is harmful to global societies at large.