Date

5-1-2020

Description

In this presentation, I will chronicle with my own register of the events and those of public media, a fairly new rape case, called La Manada, that ignited an uproar and eventually led to marches and protests across Spain and city capitals in Latin America. By analyzing the reaction of the public after the initial verdict, I expect to unveil possible collective motives found at the base of the perturbed public and detail the ways in which these become echoes of ideas and images found on very popular Spanish plays, such as Bodas de Sangre, a play written by Federico Garcia Lorca in the early 20th century. My presentation aims to show how this popular literary text serves as a relevant interlocutor when determining societal pressures and expectations, especially found in women, that develop into issues for modern-day Spain. Curiously enough, Lorca gained inspiration for Bodas de Sangre after reading an article in a Spanish newspaper about a case of a runaway bride who fled her wedding to be with her lover, which in turn stunned the public enough for them to publicize the events that took place. Although Lorca merely used this case as inspiration and ultimately wove this case into a fictitious play of passion, hopelessness, and death, the play seems to serve again as a mirror to a society that needs to be warned of the dangers that lurked beneath their societal pressures.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

How Las Bodas de Sangre Can Help Bring into a New Light Cases like La Manada

In this presentation, I will chronicle with my own register of the events and those of public media, a fairly new rape case, called La Manada, that ignited an uproar and eventually led to marches and protests across Spain and city capitals in Latin America. By analyzing the reaction of the public after the initial verdict, I expect to unveil possible collective motives found at the base of the perturbed public and detail the ways in which these become echoes of ideas and images found on very popular Spanish plays, such as Bodas de Sangre, a play written by Federico Garcia Lorca in the early 20th century. My presentation aims to show how this popular literary text serves as a relevant interlocutor when determining societal pressures and expectations, especially found in women, that develop into issues for modern-day Spain. Curiously enough, Lorca gained inspiration for Bodas de Sangre after reading an article in a Spanish newspaper about a case of a runaway bride who fled her wedding to be with her lover, which in turn stunned the public enough for them to publicize the events that took place. Although Lorca merely used this case as inspiration and ultimately wove this case into a fictitious play of passion, hopelessness, and death, the play seems to serve again as a mirror to a society that needs to be warned of the dangers that lurked beneath their societal pressures.