Presenter Information

Meanna GrayFollow

Date

5-1-2020

Description

The intersectional identity of race, class, gender, and religious beliefs complicates the introduction of presidential candidates whose identities do not uniformly prescribe to the traditional white male identity. The introduction of Barack Obama as a presidential candidate was a critical paradigm shift in the relationship between voters and presidential candidates because he was the first candidate whose race did not ascribe to this political norm. There exists a misguided notion in academia that Black-identifying voters represent a monolithic voting bloc that conforms to a singular political identity. A key variable in understanding Obama's pivotal role in Black-identifying voting behavior can be seen in Black evangelicals' political behavior that is inconsistent with their ideological agenda. Political actors' decision-making tactics need to be reanalyzed due to the increasing changes in the racial diversity of presidential candidates. This phenomenon requires an updated interdisciplinary lens with critical race theory to observe political behavior that complicates previous conventional wisdoms. This study aims to answer the question, "Why did Black evangelicals support the presidential campaign of Barack Obama?" The purpose is to illustrate the implications of newly introduced presidential candidates and their impact on the distribution of the electorate. This research also serves to update the outdated national rhetoric when describing Black voters that use the term "African American" this is increasingly exclusive to diverse voter identities within the African Diaspora. This study conducted nearly 200 surveys and twenty interviews to observe the impact of intersectionality on the relationship between Barack Obama and Black evangelicals.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Black Evangelicals and the Democratic Party: Intersectionality and the Myth of the Monolithic Black Vote

The intersectional identity of race, class, gender, and religious beliefs complicates the introduction of presidential candidates whose identities do not uniformly prescribe to the traditional white male identity. The introduction of Barack Obama as a presidential candidate was a critical paradigm shift in the relationship between voters and presidential candidates because he was the first candidate whose race did not ascribe to this political norm. There exists a misguided notion in academia that Black-identifying voters represent a monolithic voting bloc that conforms to a singular political identity. A key variable in understanding Obama's pivotal role in Black-identifying voting behavior can be seen in Black evangelicals' political behavior that is inconsistent with their ideological agenda. Political actors' decision-making tactics need to be reanalyzed due to the increasing changes in the racial diversity of presidential candidates. This phenomenon requires an updated interdisciplinary lens with critical race theory to observe political behavior that complicates previous conventional wisdoms. This study aims to answer the question, "Why did Black evangelicals support the presidential campaign of Barack Obama?" The purpose is to illustrate the implications of newly introduced presidential candidates and their impact on the distribution of the electorate. This research also serves to update the outdated national rhetoric when describing Black voters that use the term "African American" this is increasingly exclusive to diverse voter identities within the African Diaspora. This study conducted nearly 200 surveys and twenty interviews to observe the impact of intersectionality on the relationship between Barack Obama and Black evangelicals.