Date

5-1-2020

Description

Using storytelling and narrative as historical artifact and act of witnessing, I challenged my students, ranging in age from eight to fourteen, to tell a story and believe that in the process of writing their lives they might find a moment of healing and an outlet of control. In the Summer of 2019, as part of the Jusoor Summer Volunteer Program, I had the opportunity to teach at the largest Syrian refugee camp in Lebanon at a school run by Jusoor. I explored the role of non-government organizations and analyzed the strain on healthcare and education in the refugee camp, all while working closely with the school children to build a small collection of archived stories. With a massive refugee crisis underway that has displaced families around the world due to violence, persecution, and crippling poverty, much of the world has been complacent. The Syrian refugee crisis provides a modern context for a very old problem. One of the smallest and most financially and politically unstable nations, Lebanon has become one of the largest receivers of Syrian refugees. While NGOs have served a leading role in responding to the crisis in Lebanon by providing services including healthcare and education, their efforts have been hindered due to economic and political instability in Lebanon. My research focuses on the work of NGOs in Lebanon, but more specifically on the lives of children in the refugee camps and an analysis of the stories written and shared as an act of expression and healing.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

The Use of Storytelling and the Experience of Teaching in a Syrian Refugee Camp in the Context of the Refugee Crisis in Lebanon, Its Various Actors, and Its Lasting Effects

Using storytelling and narrative as historical artifact and act of witnessing, I challenged my students, ranging in age from eight to fourteen, to tell a story and believe that in the process of writing their lives they might find a moment of healing and an outlet of control. In the Summer of 2019, as part of the Jusoor Summer Volunteer Program, I had the opportunity to teach at the largest Syrian refugee camp in Lebanon at a school run by Jusoor. I explored the role of non-government organizations and analyzed the strain on healthcare and education in the refugee camp, all while working closely with the school children to build a small collection of archived stories. With a massive refugee crisis underway that has displaced families around the world due to violence, persecution, and crippling poverty, much of the world has been complacent. The Syrian refugee crisis provides a modern context for a very old problem. One of the smallest and most financially and politically unstable nations, Lebanon has become one of the largest receivers of Syrian refugees. While NGOs have served a leading role in responding to the crisis in Lebanon by providing services including healthcare and education, their efforts have been hindered due to economic and political instability in Lebanon. My research focuses on the work of NGOs in Lebanon, but more specifically on the lives of children in the refugee camps and an analysis of the stories written and shared as an act of expression and healing.