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Date

4-28-2020

Description

Subjective well-being is proposed to be positively correlated with the personality trait of extraversion. Past research has also found a positive relationship between the use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, such as cognitive reappraisal, and extraversion. However, to date, very few studies have simultaneously investigated the direct relationship between subjective well-being, extraversion, and cognitive reappraisal. To address this gap in the literature, the present study investigated (1) whether there is a positive correlation between extraversion and subjective well-being, (2) whether the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being is entirely explained by cognitive reappraisal, and (3) if cognitive reappraisal moderates the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being. The study used self-report data from 87 participants (n = 87) who completed an online survey to assess their level of subjective well-being, extraversion, and the use of cognitive reappraisal. The results revealed that there was a significant positive correlation between the use of cognitive reappraisal and subjective well-being. This finding has important implications for the fields of parenting and education in terms of how they promote the use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies in youth. The findings also showed that cognitive reappraisal neither moderated nor explained the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being. This raises interesting questions about the nature of interactions between emotion regulation and personality traits that merits further research.

Keywords: Subjective well-being, Extraversion, Cognitive reappraisal

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Cognitive Reappraisal and Subjective Well-being: A Correlational Analysis

Subjective well-being is proposed to be positively correlated with the personality trait of extraversion. Past research has also found a positive relationship between the use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, such as cognitive reappraisal, and extraversion. However, to date, very few studies have simultaneously investigated the direct relationship between subjective well-being, extraversion, and cognitive reappraisal. To address this gap in the literature, the present study investigated (1) whether there is a positive correlation between extraversion and subjective well-being, (2) whether the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being is entirely explained by cognitive reappraisal, and (3) if cognitive reappraisal moderates the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being. The study used self-report data from 87 participants (n = 87) who completed an online survey to assess their level of subjective well-being, extraversion, and the use of cognitive reappraisal. The results revealed that there was a significant positive correlation between the use of cognitive reappraisal and subjective well-being. This finding has important implications for the fields of parenting and education in terms of how they promote the use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies in youth. The findings also showed that cognitive reappraisal neither moderated nor explained the relationship between extraversion and subjective well-being. This raises interesting questions about the nature of interactions between emotion regulation and personality traits that merits further research.

Keywords: Subjective well-being, Extraversion, Cognitive reappraisal