Date

4-30-2020

Description

Despite lengthy histories of complicated race relations, the state of Maryland and Baltimore city struggle to confront their histories of slaveholding and anti-black violence. As Anthropologist Cheryl LaRoche explains, "Maryland is not very good at discussing these thingsand part is to downplay these things we see." As a result, this history has been understudied in broader accounts of racial uprisings in the U.S. In response to this gap, my digital exhibition, Understanding Uprising: Media Discourse and Maryland Race Uprisings, captures three such flashpoints: a slave insurrection beginning in Charles County in 1845; Baltimore's Holy Week Uprisings in response to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination in 1968; and the 2015 Baltimore Uprising protesting police brutality and the death of Freddie Gray. Through my curation of press archives, including news clippings, editorials, social media posts, and other forms of digital and print media, this exhibition yields two key findings that I trace across 170 years of coverage: first, black newspapers are more likely to consider the complex root causes of resistance and uprising while newspapers coded as mainstream tend to focus on a singular event or ignore causes altogether, painting uprising as baseless; finally, mainstream media often resorts to racial tropes or stereotypes in their coverage of black uprisings, further diminishing the acts of resistance and building fear within white audiences. I contend that readers must consider not only the content of media coverage of uprisings but how the coverage is framed rhetorically and historically.

Visit: https://rhetoricofuprising.omeka.net/intro

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

Understanding Uprisings: Media Discourse and Maryland Race Uprisings (1845-2015)

Despite lengthy histories of complicated race relations, the state of Maryland and Baltimore city struggle to confront their histories of slaveholding and anti-black violence. As Anthropologist Cheryl LaRoche explains, "Maryland is not very good at discussing these thingsand part is to downplay these things we see." As a result, this history has been understudied in broader accounts of racial uprisings in the U.S. In response to this gap, my digital exhibition, Understanding Uprising: Media Discourse and Maryland Race Uprisings, captures three such flashpoints: a slave insurrection beginning in Charles County in 1845; Baltimore's Holy Week Uprisings in response to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination in 1968; and the 2015 Baltimore Uprising protesting police brutality and the death of Freddie Gray. Through my curation of press archives, including news clippings, editorials, social media posts, and other forms of digital and print media, this exhibition yields two key findings that I trace across 170 years of coverage: first, black newspapers are more likely to consider the complex root causes of resistance and uprising while newspapers coded as mainstream tend to focus on a singular event or ignore causes altogether, painting uprising as baseless; finally, mainstream media often resorts to racial tropes or stereotypes in their coverage of black uprisings, further diminishing the acts of resistance and building fear within white audiences. I contend that readers must consider not only the content of media coverage of uprisings but how the coverage is framed rhetorically and historically.

Visit: https://rhetoricofuprising.omeka.net/intro