Date

4-30-2020

Description

My presentation will include a discussion of the short story cycle genre as well as a reading from one of the stories from my collection, Go Your Own Way. I took inspiration from Susan Minot's Monkeys (1986) and Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine (1984). Monkeys follows a single family mainly from the perspective of the middle daughter while Love Medicine follows several family members from various perspectives and takes place in different areas in the United States. Susan Garland Mann (1988) states that stories in the short story cycle can be read individually, but reading all the stories together creates an arc that cannot be accomplished with a single story. All three stories in my short story cycle, Go Your Own Way, can be read individually. However, each story contains questions only answered in the next installment, leading readers to pursue the other stories. Go Your Own Way is told in two different perspectives of citizens of the same town. However, what really connects these characters is not family or even a town but an object. Monkeys and Love Medicine feature specific objects of meaning for key characters such as a red convertible and a house, but a single, consistent object driving the story is not present. Go Your Own Way contains an object so vital to the story that the cycle would not exist without it.

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

'Everything's Waiting for You': The Importance of the Short Story Cycle

My presentation will include a discussion of the short story cycle genre as well as a reading from one of the stories from my collection, Go Your Own Way. I took inspiration from Susan Minot's Monkeys (1986) and Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine (1984). Monkeys follows a single family mainly from the perspective of the middle daughter while Love Medicine follows several family members from various perspectives and takes place in different areas in the United States. Susan Garland Mann (1988) states that stories in the short story cycle can be read individually, but reading all the stories together creates an arc that cannot be accomplished with a single story. All three stories in my short story cycle, Go Your Own Way, can be read individually. However, each story contains questions only answered in the next installment, leading readers to pursue the other stories. Go Your Own Way is told in two different perspectives of citizens of the same town. However, what really connects these characters is not family or even a town but an object. Monkeys and Love Medicine feature specific objects of meaning for key characters such as a red convertible and a house, but a single, consistent object driving the story is not present. Go Your Own Way contains an object so vital to the story that the cycle would not exist without it.